The impact of hyperthermia and infection on acute ischemic stroke patients in the intensive care unit

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Despite the recognized deleterious effects of hyperthermia on critically ill neurological patients, few investigations have studied hyperthermia after an ischemic stroke in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Methods: Acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to the ICU were assigned to one of three groups: normothermia, mild hyperthermia (MH), or severe hyperthermia (SH). The etiology of hyperthermia was further divided into infectious and non-infectious groups. Results: Among the 150 patients included in the study, MH and SH were observed in 15 and 40 patients, respectively. Hyperthermia and the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score were independently related to in-hospital mortality and increased length of stay in the ICU (ILOS, ≥4 days). Discussion: Infection (39 patients) was more prevalent in the SH group than in the MH group and was associated with greater ILOS. Conclusions: Monitoring and managing infection and reducing body temperature may be important factors for determining the outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to the ICU.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-188
Number of pages6
JournalNeurocritical Care
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Oct 1

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Intensive Care Units
Fever
Stroke
Infection
Glasgow Coma Scale
Hospital Mortality
Body Temperature
Critical Illness
Length of Stay

Keywords

  • Body temperature changes
  • Infection
  • Intensive care
  • Ischemic stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "The impact of hyperthermia and infection on acute ischemic stroke patients in the intensive care unit",
abstract = "Introduction: Despite the recognized deleterious effects of hyperthermia on critically ill neurological patients, few investigations have studied hyperthermia after an ischemic stroke in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Methods: Acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to the ICU were assigned to one of three groups: normothermia, mild hyperthermia (MH), or severe hyperthermia (SH). The etiology of hyperthermia was further divided into infectious and non-infectious groups. Results: Among the 150 patients included in the study, MH and SH were observed in 15 and 40 patients, respectively. Hyperthermia and the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score were independently related to in-hospital mortality and increased length of stay in the ICU (ILOS, ≥4 days). Discussion: Infection (39 patients) was more prevalent in the SH group than in the MH group and was associated with greater ILOS. Conclusions: Monitoring and managing infection and reducing body temperature may be important factors for determining the outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to the ICU.",
keywords = "Body temperature changes, Infection, Intensive care, Ischemic stroke",
author = "Seo, {Woo Keun} and Sungwook Yu and Kim, {Ji Hyun} and Park, {Kun Woo} and Koh, {Seong Beom}",
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T1 - The impact of hyperthermia and infection on acute ischemic stroke patients in the intensive care unit

AU - Seo, Woo Keun

AU - Yu, Sungwook

AU - Kim, Ji Hyun

AU - Park, Kun Woo

AU - Koh, Seong Beom

PY - 2008/10/1

Y1 - 2008/10/1

N2 - Introduction: Despite the recognized deleterious effects of hyperthermia on critically ill neurological patients, few investigations have studied hyperthermia after an ischemic stroke in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Methods: Acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to the ICU were assigned to one of three groups: normothermia, mild hyperthermia (MH), or severe hyperthermia (SH). The etiology of hyperthermia was further divided into infectious and non-infectious groups. Results: Among the 150 patients included in the study, MH and SH were observed in 15 and 40 patients, respectively. Hyperthermia and the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score were independently related to in-hospital mortality and increased length of stay in the ICU (ILOS, ≥4 days). Discussion: Infection (39 patients) was more prevalent in the SH group than in the MH group and was associated with greater ILOS. Conclusions: Monitoring and managing infection and reducing body temperature may be important factors for determining the outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to the ICU.

AB - Introduction: Despite the recognized deleterious effects of hyperthermia on critically ill neurological patients, few investigations have studied hyperthermia after an ischemic stroke in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Methods: Acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to the ICU were assigned to one of three groups: normothermia, mild hyperthermia (MH), or severe hyperthermia (SH). The etiology of hyperthermia was further divided into infectious and non-infectious groups. Results: Among the 150 patients included in the study, MH and SH were observed in 15 and 40 patients, respectively. Hyperthermia and the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score were independently related to in-hospital mortality and increased length of stay in the ICU (ILOS, ≥4 days). Discussion: Infection (39 patients) was more prevalent in the SH group than in the MH group and was associated with greater ILOS. Conclusions: Monitoring and managing infection and reducing body temperature may be important factors for determining the outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to the ICU.

KW - Body temperature changes

KW - Infection

KW - Intensive care

KW - Ischemic stroke

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