The influence of self-construal on self-brand congruity in the United States and Korea

Youngjun Sung, Sejung Marina Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present research extends the self-concept literature by examining the self-brand congruity hypothesis in two different cultures: the United States as an example of an individualistic culture and Korea as a collectivistic culture. The results of this research demonstrate that brands with distinct personality traits that are congruent with consumers' self-concepts are evaluated more positively than brands with incongruent personality traits across cultures. More important, the findings suggest that the self-brand congruity effects are more evident in the United States than in Korea, lending empirical evidence that self-consistency is less emphasized and salient in East Asian cultures than in Western cultures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-166
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Korea
Self Concept
Personality
Research
self-concept
personality traits
lending
evidence

Keywords

  • brand personality
  • self-brand congruity
  • self-construal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology

Cite this

The influence of self-construal on self-brand congruity in the United States and Korea. / Sung, Youngjun; Choi, Sejung Marina.

In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Vol. 43, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 151-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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