The joint effects of some beverages intake and smoking on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Korean adults: Data analysis of the Korea national health and nutrition examination survey (KNHANES), 2008-2015

Ji Eun Min, Da An Huh, Kyong Whan Moon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Some beverages and smoking cause an inflammatory response in the lungs and airways in a similar way, ultimately affecting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) occurrence. Using a nationally representative health survey database, this study investigates the individual and joint effects of consumption of different beverages and smoking on COPD. This study is a crosssectional analysis of 15,961 Korean adults in the Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey of 2008-2015. COPD was defined as forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) divided by forced vital capacity (FVC) <0.70. We used multiple linear and logistic regression models to examine the association of beverage consumption and smoking with an FEV1/FVC ratio and odds ratio (OR) for COPD. The mean FEV1/FVC ratio decreased with increasing soda intake (p = 0.016), coffee intake (p = 0.031), and smoking status; however, the mean FEV1/FVC ratio increased with increasing green tea intake frequency (p = 0.029). When soda intake increased to 10 times/month, the OR of having COPD increased to 1.04 times (95% CI: 1.01, 1.07). The positive joint effect of soda intake and smoking on COPD was marginally significant (p = 0.058). We found that soda intake, coffee intake, and smoking increased airflow limitation while green tea intake decreased it. In addition, soda intake and smoking had a positive joint effect on COPD in the Korean population.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2611
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume17
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Apr 1

Keywords

  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • Coffee
  • Green tea
  • Interaction
  • Korean adults
  • Lung function
  • Smoking
  • Soda

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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