The Long-run Labour Market Effects of Expanding Access to Higher Education in South Korea

Haeil Jung, Maureen A. Pirog, Sang Kyoo Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 1979 military coup in South Korea mandated that all colleges, public and private, expand their college admission quotas by 30 per cent in 1981 and 50 per cent in 1982. We use birth cohorts that were differentially exposed to this abrupt, exogenous policy change as an instrumental variable to identify the long-term effects of college on labour market outcomes. We find that the college enrollment increase by the mandate led to higher monthly earnings and higher probabilities of ‘prestigious’ white-collar employment. We discuss the historical context in which this intervention took place as well as its relevance for developing countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)974-990
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of International Development
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Aug 1

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higher education
labor market
South Korea
developing world
education
Military
developing country
public
long-term effect
mandate
effect
policy

Keywords

  • birth cohorts
  • college education
  • earnings
  • employment
  • instrumental variable
  • natural experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development

Cite this

The Long-run Labour Market Effects of Expanding Access to Higher Education in South Korea. / Jung, Haeil; Pirog, Maureen A.; Lee, Sang Kyoo.

In: Journal of International Development, Vol. 28, No. 6, 01.08.2016, p. 974-990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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