The relationship between aortic stiffness and left ventricular dyssynchrony in hypertensive patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function

Mi Na Kim, Seong-Mi Park, Wan Joo Shim, Yong Hyun Kim, Su A. Kim, Dong Hyuk Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony is often seen in patients with hypertension, even without heart failure. Arterial stiffness is well accepted as an important factor of increasing blood pressure and influencing ventricular function. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between aortic stiffness and LV dyssynchrony in hypertensive patients with preserved LV systolic function. Eighty hypertensive patients with preserved LV systolic function (LV ejection fraction > 50) and 30 controls were studied. The LV systolic and diastolic dyssynchrony indices were determined as the standard deviation of the time interval from onset of the QRS complex to peak myocardial systolic velocity (Ts-SD) and to early diastolic velocity (Te-SD) and the maximal differences in Ts (Ts-Max) and Te (Te-Max) in 12 LV segments. Aortic stiffness index was calculated from aortic diameters in the systolic and diastolic phases, as measured by echocardiography and blood pressure. No relationship was observed between LV systolic and diastolic dyssynchrony indices (r=0.057, P=.61). In simple regression, aortic stiffness parameter was related to left ventricular mass index (LVMI), E/A ratio, and LV diastolic dyssynchrony index. But using multiple linear regression, Te-Max remained as a single variable related to aortic strain and aortic stiffness index (r=-0.271, P=.008 and r=0.269, P=.008). LVMI was related to aortic distensibility using multiple linear regression (r=-0.239, P=.02). Aortic stiffness index was related to LV diastolic dyssynchrony index and LVMI. These findings suggest that LV diastolic dyssynchronous changes may be caused by increased LV mass and arterial stiffness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-416
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and Experimental Hypertension
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Oct 1

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Vascular Stiffness
Left Ventricular Function
Linear Models
Blood Pressure
Ventricular Function
Stroke Volume
Echocardiography
Heart Failure
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Aortic stiffness
  • Hypertension
  • Left ventricular dyssynchrony
  • Left ventricular hypertrophy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology

Cite this

The relationship between aortic stiffness and left ventricular dyssynchrony in hypertensive patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function. / Kim, Mi Na; Park, Seong-Mi; Shim, Wan Joo; Kim, Yong Hyun; Kim, Su A.; Cho, Dong Hyuk.

In: Clinical and Experimental Hypertension, Vol. 34, No. 6, 01.10.2012, p. 410-416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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