The role of erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (ERDR1) in the control of proliferation and photodynamic therapy (PDT) response

Sunyoung Park, Kyung Eun Kim, Hyun Jeong Park, Daeho Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (ERDR1) was newly identified as a secreted protein that plays an essential role in maintaining cell growth homeostasis. ERDR1 enhances apoptosis at high cell densities, leading to the inhibition of cell survival. Exogenous ERDR1 treatment decreases cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth as a result of increased apoptosis via the regulation of apoptosis-related gene expression. Moreover, ERDR1 plays a pivotal role in skin diseases; ERDR1 expression in actinic keratosis (AK) is negatively correlated with the increase in apoptosis. Because of its high specificity and efficiency, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a common therapy for patients with various skin diseases, including cancer. Many studies indicate that apoptosis is mainly induced by PDT treatment. As an apoptosis inducer, the recovery of the ERDR1 expression after PDT is correlated with good therapeutic outcomes. Here, we review recent findings that highlight the function of ERDR1 in the control of apoptosis. Thus, ERDR1 may have a role in the apoptosis regulation of target cells in the lesions, as the recovery of its expression after PDT is correlated with good therapeutic outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2603
JournalInternational journal of molecular sciences
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Apr 1

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (ERDR1)
  • Photodynamic therapy (PDT)
  • Skin cancer
  • Skin disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

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