The role of Korean Council on Medical Education and its future direction

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

This study was conducted to recognize the role of Korean Council on Medical Education (KCME), which is composed of 12 medical organizations related to medical education, and its importance in Korean medical society. The historical background of the establishment of the KCME is reviewed, along with changes in medical education in Korea starting in the early 1960s. In 1971, the first organization for medical education in Korea, the Association of Korean Medical Colleges, was established by 14 deans of medical colleges. This organization sought to create a good environment for medical education, but because of conflict between deans and medical educators, in 1983 it was divided into two organizations: the Korean Society of Medical Education and the Korean Council of Deans of Medical Colleges. Neither was active until they co-organized a congress about medical education in 1994, and fortunately, they have continued to collaborate since. At that time, the Korean government aggressively tried to authorize 9 new medical colleges, which caused Korean organizations related to medical education to unite against this governmental policy by establishing the KCME. The KCME played an important role in monitoring policy changes and achieved some noteworthy results. However, recent changes, including the fourth industrial revolution and patterns of mutual influence among medical education, research and clinical practice, have spurred the KCME to change and broaden its activities. Therefore, the KCME should take the lead in launching a serious discussion reorganizing Korean medical societies so that academic medicine and practical medicine may flourish.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)294-299
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Korean Medical Association
Volume62
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Keywords

  • Administration; History; Capacity building; Organizational policy
  • Education
  • Medical; Organization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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