The utility of the human papillomavirus DNA load for the diagnosis and prediction of persistent vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia

Kyeong A. So, Jin Hwa Hong, Jong Ha Hwang, Seung Hun Song, Jae Kwan Lee, Nak Woo Lee, Kyu Wan Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objecti ve: We evaluated the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA load for the diagnosis and prediction of persistent vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN). Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of patients with a pathological diagnosis of VAIN was performed. Eligible women (N=48) were followed for cytology and HPV DNA test, and colposcopic biopsies were taken at 3-to 6-month intervals. Thirty-seven patients were followed for more than 6 months; their HPV DNA test results were compared to the cytology results for the prediction of disease prognosis. Results: The degree of VAIN was more severe in patients with a high initial HPV DNA load (p=0.009). Patients with VAIN 2 and VAIN 3 were older than those with VAIN 1 (p=0.005 and 0.008, respectively). In 26 out of 37 patients (70.3%), the VAIN resolved. The other patients had persistent lesions with no progression to invasive vaginal carcinoma. The last follow-up HPV DNA load was significantly higher in the group with persistent VAIN compared to the group with resolved VAIN (p<0.0001). Negative cytology was observed in 25 out of 26 patients in the VAIN resolved group and in nine out of 11 patients in the VAIN persistent group (p=0.205). Conclusion: These results suggest that the HPV DNA test, especially for viral load, was more effective for the diagnosis and prediction of persistent VAIN than cytology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)232-237
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of gynecologic oncology
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Dec

Keywords

  • Human papillomavirus
  • Vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia
  • Viral load

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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