Titrated propofol induction vs. continuous infusion in children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging

Jang-Eun Cho, W. O. Kim, D. J. Chang, E. M. Choi, S. Y. Oh, H. K. Kil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Propofol is the popular intravenous (i.v.) anaesthetic for paediatric sedation because of its rapid onset and recovery. We compared the efficacy and safety of a single dose and conventional infusion of propofol for sedation in children who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: This was a double-blind, randomized-controlled study. One hundred and sixty children were assigned to group I (single dose) or II (infusion). Sedation was induced with i.v. propofol 2 mg/kg, and supplemental doses of propofol 0.5 mg/kg were administered until adequate sedation was achieved. After the induction of sedation, we treated patients with a continuous infusion of normal saline at a rate of 0.3 ml/kg/h in group I and the same volume of propofol in group II. In case of inadequate sedation, additional propofol 0.5 mg/kg was administered and the infusion rate was increased by 0.05 ml/kg/h. Induction time, sedation time, recovery time, additional sedation and adverse events were recorded. Results: Recovery time was significantly shorter in group I compared with group II [0 (0-3) vs. 1 (0-3), respectively, P<0.001]. Group I (single dose) had significantly more patients with recovery time 0 compared with group II (infusion) (65/80 vs. 36/80, respectively, P<0.001). Induction and sedation times were not significantly different between groups. There was no significant difference in the frequency of additional sedation and adverse events between groups. Conclusion: A single dose of propofol without a continuous infusion can provide appropriate sedation in children undergoing MRI for <30 min.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-457
Number of pages5
JournalActa Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Apr 1
Externally publishedYes

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Propofol
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Intravenous Anesthetics
Pediatrics
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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Titrated propofol induction vs. continuous infusion in children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging. / Cho, Jang-Eun; Kim, W. O.; Chang, D. J.; Choi, E. M.; Oh, S. Y.; Kil, H. K.

In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, Vol. 54, No. 4, 01.04.2010, p. 453-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cho, Jang-Eun ; Kim, W. O. ; Chang, D. J. ; Choi, E. M. ; Oh, S. Y. ; Kil, H. K. / Titrated propofol induction vs. continuous infusion in children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging. In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica. 2010 ; Vol. 54, No. 4. pp. 453-457.
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