Topiramate as an adjuvant treatment with atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenic patients experiencing weight gain

Young-Hoon Ko, Sook Haeng Joe, In Kwa Jung, Seung Hyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Schizophrenic patients commonly suffer weight gain, which is often associated with widely prescribed antipsychotic medicines. It is distressing to most patients who experience it and may affect their response to treatment of schizophrenia. Weight gain is also associated with treatment noncompliance and several medical conditions. This study explored the efficacy and tolerability of topiramate as an adjuvant treatment of patients with schizophrenia who were carrying excess weight. In this 12-week, randomized, placebo-controlled prospective study, 66 hospitalized patients with schizophrenia who were carrying excess weight were given topiramate at doses of 100 mg/day or 200 mg/day, or a placebo. The primary measures made were body weight, body mass index, waist measurement, hip measurement, and waist-to-hip ratio. Safety measures included physical examinations and the monitoring of adverse effects, clinical laboratory data, and vital signs. The Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness scale (CGI-S) and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) were used to quantify changes in schizophrenic symptoms and signs. In the 200-mg/day topiramate group, body weight, body mass index, waist measurement, and hip measurement decreased significantly compared with the 100-mg/day topiramate and placebo groups over 12 weeks. However, the waist-to-hip ratio did not change in any group. Scores on the CGI-S and BPRS decreased significantly over the 12-week period in both topiramate groups, but the decrease was not clinically meaningful. These results suggest that a higher dose of topiramate is efficacious as an adjuvant treatment of patients with schizophrenia experiencing excess weight gain. Further clinical research is required to establish guidelines for the use of topiramate as an antiobesity agent in schizophrenic patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-175
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Neuropharmacology
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jul 1

Fingerprint

Antipsychotic Agents
Weight Gain
Schizophrenia
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale
Waist-Hip Ratio
Placebos
Therapeutics
Hip
Body Mass Index
Body Weight
Anti-Obesity Agents
Weights and Measures
Vital Signs
topiramate
Signs and Symptoms
Physical Examination
Prospective Studies
Guidelines
Safety
Research

Keywords

  • Obesity
  • Overweight
  • Schizophrenia
  • Topiramate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Topiramate as an adjuvant treatment with atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenic patients experiencing weight gain. / Ko, Young-Hoon; Joe, Sook Haeng; Jung, In Kwa; Kim, Seung Hyun.

In: Clinical Neuropharmacology, Vol. 28, No. 4, 01.07.2005, p. 169-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{04610c7dd47d4e719bdcc332dfd65a91,
title = "Topiramate as an adjuvant treatment with atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenic patients experiencing weight gain",
abstract = "Schizophrenic patients commonly suffer weight gain, which is often associated with widely prescribed antipsychotic medicines. It is distressing to most patients who experience it and may affect their response to treatment of schizophrenia. Weight gain is also associated with treatment noncompliance and several medical conditions. This study explored the efficacy and tolerability of topiramate as an adjuvant treatment of patients with schizophrenia who were carrying excess weight. In this 12-week, randomized, placebo-controlled prospective study, 66 hospitalized patients with schizophrenia who were carrying excess weight were given topiramate at doses of 100 mg/day or 200 mg/day, or a placebo. The primary measures made were body weight, body mass index, waist measurement, hip measurement, and waist-to-hip ratio. Safety measures included physical examinations and the monitoring of adverse effects, clinical laboratory data, and vital signs. The Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness scale (CGI-S) and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) were used to quantify changes in schizophrenic symptoms and signs. In the 200-mg/day topiramate group, body weight, body mass index, waist measurement, and hip measurement decreased significantly compared with the 100-mg/day topiramate and placebo groups over 12 weeks. However, the waist-to-hip ratio did not change in any group. Scores on the CGI-S and BPRS decreased significantly over the 12-week period in both topiramate groups, but the decrease was not clinically meaningful. These results suggest that a higher dose of topiramate is efficacious as an adjuvant treatment of patients with schizophrenia experiencing excess weight gain. Further clinical research is required to establish guidelines for the use of topiramate as an antiobesity agent in schizophrenic patients.",
keywords = "Obesity, Overweight, Schizophrenia, Topiramate",
author = "Young-Hoon Ko and Joe, {Sook Haeng} and Jung, {In Kwa} and Kim, {Seung Hyun}",
year = "2005",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/01.wnf.0000172994.56028.c3",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "169--175",
journal = "Clinical Neuropharmacology",
issn = "0362-5664",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Topiramate as an adjuvant treatment with atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenic patients experiencing weight gain

AU - Ko, Young-Hoon

AU - Joe, Sook Haeng

AU - Jung, In Kwa

AU - Kim, Seung Hyun

PY - 2005/7/1

Y1 - 2005/7/1

N2 - Schizophrenic patients commonly suffer weight gain, which is often associated with widely prescribed antipsychotic medicines. It is distressing to most patients who experience it and may affect their response to treatment of schizophrenia. Weight gain is also associated with treatment noncompliance and several medical conditions. This study explored the efficacy and tolerability of topiramate as an adjuvant treatment of patients with schizophrenia who were carrying excess weight. In this 12-week, randomized, placebo-controlled prospective study, 66 hospitalized patients with schizophrenia who were carrying excess weight were given topiramate at doses of 100 mg/day or 200 mg/day, or a placebo. The primary measures made were body weight, body mass index, waist measurement, hip measurement, and waist-to-hip ratio. Safety measures included physical examinations and the monitoring of adverse effects, clinical laboratory data, and vital signs. The Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness scale (CGI-S) and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) were used to quantify changes in schizophrenic symptoms and signs. In the 200-mg/day topiramate group, body weight, body mass index, waist measurement, and hip measurement decreased significantly compared with the 100-mg/day topiramate and placebo groups over 12 weeks. However, the waist-to-hip ratio did not change in any group. Scores on the CGI-S and BPRS decreased significantly over the 12-week period in both topiramate groups, but the decrease was not clinically meaningful. These results suggest that a higher dose of topiramate is efficacious as an adjuvant treatment of patients with schizophrenia experiencing excess weight gain. Further clinical research is required to establish guidelines for the use of topiramate as an antiobesity agent in schizophrenic patients.

AB - Schizophrenic patients commonly suffer weight gain, which is often associated with widely prescribed antipsychotic medicines. It is distressing to most patients who experience it and may affect their response to treatment of schizophrenia. Weight gain is also associated with treatment noncompliance and several medical conditions. This study explored the efficacy and tolerability of topiramate as an adjuvant treatment of patients with schizophrenia who were carrying excess weight. In this 12-week, randomized, placebo-controlled prospective study, 66 hospitalized patients with schizophrenia who were carrying excess weight were given topiramate at doses of 100 mg/day or 200 mg/day, or a placebo. The primary measures made were body weight, body mass index, waist measurement, hip measurement, and waist-to-hip ratio. Safety measures included physical examinations and the monitoring of adverse effects, clinical laboratory data, and vital signs. The Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness scale (CGI-S) and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) were used to quantify changes in schizophrenic symptoms and signs. In the 200-mg/day topiramate group, body weight, body mass index, waist measurement, and hip measurement decreased significantly compared with the 100-mg/day topiramate and placebo groups over 12 weeks. However, the waist-to-hip ratio did not change in any group. Scores on the CGI-S and BPRS decreased significantly over the 12-week period in both topiramate groups, but the decrease was not clinically meaningful. These results suggest that a higher dose of topiramate is efficacious as an adjuvant treatment of patients with schizophrenia experiencing excess weight gain. Further clinical research is required to establish guidelines for the use of topiramate as an antiobesity agent in schizophrenic patients.

KW - Obesity

KW - Overweight

KW - Schizophrenia

KW - Topiramate

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=23644458315&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=23644458315&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.wnf.0000172994.56028.c3

DO - 10.1097/01.wnf.0000172994.56028.c3

M3 - Article

C2 - 16062095

AN - SCOPUS:23644458315

VL - 28

SP - 169

EP - 175

JO - Clinical Neuropharmacology

JF - Clinical Neuropharmacology

SN - 0362-5664

IS - 4

ER -