Touch can change visual slant perception

Marc O. Ernst, Martin S. Banks, Heinrich Bulthoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

151 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The visual system uses several signals to deduce the three-dimensional structure of the environment, including binocular disparity, texture gradients, shading and motion parallax. Although each of these sources of information is independently insufficient to yield reliable three-dimensional structure from everyday scenes, the visual system combines them by weighing the available information; altering the weights would therefore change the perceived structure. We report that haptic feedback (active touch) increases the weight of a consistent surface-slant signal relative to inconsistent signals. Thus, appearance of a subsequently viewed surface is changed: the surface appears slanted in the direction specified by the haptically reinforced signal.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-73
Number of pages5
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Visual Perception
Touch
Vision Disparity
Weights and Measures
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Touch can change visual slant perception. / Ernst, Marc O.; Banks, Martin S.; Bulthoff, Heinrich.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.01.2000, p. 69-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ernst, Marc O. ; Banks, Martin S. ; Bulthoff, Heinrich. / Touch can change visual slant perception. In: Nature Neuroscience. 2000 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 69-73.
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