Trends in lipid profiles among South Korean adults: 2005, 2008 and 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Ga E.un Nam, Kyungdo Han, Yong G.yu Park, Youn S.eon Choi, Seon M.ee Kim, Sang Yhun Ju, Byung Joon Ko, Yang H.yun Kim, Eun H.ye Kim, Kyung H.wan Cho, Do H.oon Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate recent trends in the prevalence and parameters of dyslipidemia and rates of lipid-lowering medication use in Korean adults. Trends in lipid profiles in subjects with hypertension, diabetes or obesity were also studied.

METHODS: Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2005, 2008 and 2010 were used in this study. A total of 17 009 subjects participated in this study.

RESULTS: There was a declining trend in the prevalence of dyslipidemia and an increasing trend in the rates of use of lipid-lowering medication among Korean adults. In both men and women, the age-adjusted mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level linearly increased. There was a significantly decreasing trend in the age-adjusted mean triglycerides in women and age-adjusted mean lipid-related ratios in both sexes. The age-adjusted mean total cholesterol level showed a slightly increasing trend and the age-adjusted mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was not changed in both sexes. These patterns persisted among subjects not taking lipid-lowering medication. The favorable trends were also observed in subjects with hypertension, diabetes and obesity.

CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed favorable trends in the prevalence of dyslipidemia and in several lipid profiles among Korean adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)286-294
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of public health (Oxford, England)
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jun 1

Fingerprint

Nutrition Surveys
Korea
Lipids
Dyslipidemias
Obesity
Hypertension
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides
Cholesterol

Keywords

  • cardiovascular risk
  • cholesterol
  • dyslipidemia
  • lipid
  • lipoprotein
  • trends

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Trends in lipid profiles among South Korean adults : 2005, 2008 and 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. / Nam, Ga E.un; Han, Kyungdo; Park, Yong G.yu; Choi, Youn S.eon; Kim, Seon M.ee; Ju, Sang Yhun; Ko, Byung Joon; Kim, Yang H.yun; Kim, Eun H.ye; Cho, Kyung H.wan; Kim, Do H.oon.

In: Journal of public health (Oxford, England), Vol. 37, No. 2, 01.06.2015, p. 286-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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