Tricking people into feeling like they are moving when they are not paying attention

Laura C. Trutoiu, Stephan Streuber, Betty J. Mohler, Jörg Schulte-Pelkum, Heinrich H. Bülthoff

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vection refers to illusion of self motion in stationary obervers usually by means of moving visual stimuli [Fischer and Kornmüller 1930]. Linear vection naturally occurs when seated in a train and observing another train on an adjacent track start moving. The very compelling but brief illusion happens as observers are not paying particular attention to the environment but are rather "defocused" from the scene. We studied the effect of two visual attention tasks on the perception of linear vection. The results show a significant decrease in vection onset time with an attention task.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAPGV 2008 - Proceedings of the Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization
Number of pages1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
EventSymposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization, APGV 2008 - Los Angeles, CA, United States
Duration: 2008 Aug 92008 Aug 10

Publication series

NameAPGV 2008 - Proceedings of the Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization

Other

OtherSymposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization, APGV 2008
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles, CA
Period08/8/908/8/10

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

Cite this

Trutoiu, L. C., Streuber, S., Mohler, B. J., Schulte-Pelkum, J., & Bülthoff, H. H. (2008). Tricking people into feeling like they are moving when they are not paying attention. In APGV 2008 - Proceedings of the Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization (APGV 2008 - Proceedings of the Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization). https://doi.org/10.1145/1394281.1394319