Tumor targeting efficiency of bare nanoparticles does not mean the efficacy of loaded anticancer drugs: Importance of radionuclide imaging for optimization of highly selective tumor targeting polymeric nanoparticles with or without drug

Beom Suk Lee, Kyeongsoon Park, Sangjin Park, Gui Chul Kim, Hyo Jung Kim, Sangjoo Lee, Heeseup Kil, Seung Jun Oh, Daeyoon Chi, Kwang Meyung Kim, KuiWon Choi, Ick Chan Kwon, Sang Yoon Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The better understanding of polymeric nanoparticles as a drug delivery carrier is a decisive factor to get more efficient therapeutic response in vivo. Here, we report the non-invasive imaging of bare polymeric nanoparticles and drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles to evaluate biodistribution in tumor bearing mice. To make nano-sized drug delivery carrier, glycol chitosan was modified with different degrees of hydrophobic N-acetyl histidine (NAcHis-GC-1, -2, and -3). The biodistribution of polymeric nanoparticles and drug was confirmed by using gamma camera with 131I-labeled NAcHis-GC and 131I-labeled doxorubicin (DOX) and by using in vivo live animal imaging with near-infrared fluorescence Cy5.5-labeled NAcHis-GC. Among bare nanoparticles, NAcHis-GC3 (7.8% NAcHis content) showed much higher tumor targeting efficiency than NAcHis-GC1 (3.3% NAcHis content) and NAcHis-GC2 (6.8% NAcHis content). In contrast, for drug-loaded nanoparticles, DOX-NAcHis-GC1 displayed two-fold higher tumor targeting property than DOX-NAcHis-GC3. These data imply that the biodistribution and tumor targeting efficiency between bare and drug-loaded nanoparticles may be greatly different. Therapeutic responses for NAcHis-GC nanoparticles after drug loading were also evaluated. In xenograft animal model, we could find out that DOX-NAcHis-GC1 with higher tumor targeting of DOX has more excellent therapeutic effect than DOX-NAcHis-GC3 and free DOX. These results mean that the hydrophobic core stability might be a critical factor for tumor targeting efficiency of nanoparticles. The present study indicates that by using molecular imaging, we can select more appropriate nanoparticles with the highest tumor targeting properties, leading to exerting more excellent therapeutic results in cancer therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-260
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Controlled Release
Volume147
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Oct 15
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Radionuclide Imaging
Nanoparticles
Doxorubicin
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Neoplasms
Drug Carriers
Gamma Cameras
Molecular Imaging
Therapeutic Uses
Therapeutics
Histidine
Heterografts
Animal Models
Fluorescence

Keywords

  • Biodistributions
  • Drug delivery
  • Gamma camera
  • NAcHis-GC
  • Near-infrared fluorescence
  • Non-invasive imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Tumor targeting efficiency of bare nanoparticles does not mean the efficacy of loaded anticancer drugs : Importance of radionuclide imaging for optimization of highly selective tumor targeting polymeric nanoparticles with or without drug. / Lee, Beom Suk; Park, Kyeongsoon; Park, Sangjin; Kim, Gui Chul; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Sangjoo; Kil, Heeseup; Oh, Seung Jun; Chi, Daeyoon; Kim, Kwang Meyung; Choi, KuiWon; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Sang Yoon.

In: Journal of Controlled Release, Vol. 147, No. 2, 15.10.2010, p. 253-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Beom Suk ; Park, Kyeongsoon ; Park, Sangjin ; Kim, Gui Chul ; Kim, Hyo Jung ; Lee, Sangjoo ; Kil, Heeseup ; Oh, Seung Jun ; Chi, Daeyoon ; Kim, Kwang Meyung ; Choi, KuiWon ; Kwon, Ick Chan ; Kim, Sang Yoon. / Tumor targeting efficiency of bare nanoparticles does not mean the efficacy of loaded anticancer drugs : Importance of radionuclide imaging for optimization of highly selective tumor targeting polymeric nanoparticles with or without drug. In: Journal of Controlled Release. 2010 ; Vol. 147, No. 2. pp. 253-260.
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AU - Kim, Hyo Jung

AU - Lee, Sangjoo

AU - Kil, Heeseup

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