Two Ways to Facial Expression Recognition? Motor and Visual Information Have Different Effects on Facial Expression Recognition

Stephan de la Rosa, Laura Fademrecht, Heinrich Bulthoff, Martin A. Giese, Cristóbal Curio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Motor-based theories of facial expression recognition propose that the visual perception of facial expression is aided by sensorimotor processes that are also used for the production of the same expression. Accordingly, sensorimotor and visual processes should provide congruent emotional information about a facial expression. Here, we report evidence that challenges this view. Specifically, the repeated execution of facial expressions has the opposite effect on the recognition of a subsequent facial expression than the repeated viewing of facial expressions. Moreover, the findings of the motor condition, but not of the visual condition, were correlated with a nonsensory condition in which participants imagined an emotional situation. These results can be well accounted for by the idea that facial expression recognition is not always mediated by motor processes but can also be recognized on visual information alone.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychological Science
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2018 Jun 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • emotions
  • facial expressions
  • motor processes
  • open data
  • social cognition
  • visual perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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