Ultra-sensitive in situ detection of silver ions using a quartz crystal microbalance

Sangmyung Lee, Kuewhan Jang, Chanho Park, Juneseok You, Taegyu Kim, Chulhwan Im, Junoh Kang, Haneul Shin, Chang Hwan Choi, Jinsung Park, Sung Soo Na

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The detection of toxic nanomaterials is highly important, because their scientific and engineering applications have rapidly increased recently. Consequently, they can harmfully impact human health and the environment. Herein, we report a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM)-based, in situ and real-time detection of toxic silver ions by measuring a frequency shift. Generally, silver ions are so small that they are difficult to be identified using conventional microscopy. However, using QCM and a label-free silver-specific cytosine DNA, ultra-sensitive and in situ detection of silver ions is performed. The limit of detection (LOD) of this sensor platform is 100 pM, which is ten times lower than the previous study using a cantilever. It also detects silver ions rapidly in real time, which is completed within 10 min. Furthermore, our proposed detection method is able to detect silver ions in drinking water. The results suggest that QCM-based detection opens a new avenue for the development of a practical water testing sensor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8028-8034
Number of pages7
JournalNew Journal of Chemistry
Volume39
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jul 27

Fingerprint

Quartz crystal microbalances
Silver
Ions
Poisons
Cytosine
Sensors
Nanostructured materials
Potable water
Drinking Water
Labels
Microscopic examination
DNA
Health
Water
Testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Catalysis
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Ultra-sensitive in situ detection of silver ions using a quartz crystal microbalance. / Lee, Sangmyung; Jang, Kuewhan; Park, Chanho; You, Juneseok; Kim, Taegyu; Im, Chulhwan; Kang, Junoh; Shin, Haneul; Choi, Chang Hwan; Park, Jinsung; Na, Sung Soo.

In: New Journal of Chemistry, Vol. 39, No. 10, 27.07.2015, p. 8028-8034.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, S, Jang, K, Park, C, You, J, Kim, T, Im, C, Kang, J, Shin, H, Choi, CH, Park, J & Na, SS 2015, 'Ultra-sensitive in situ detection of silver ions using a quartz crystal microbalance', New Journal of Chemistry, vol. 39, no. 10, pp. 8028-8034. https://doi.org/10.1039/c5nj00668f
Lee, Sangmyung ; Jang, Kuewhan ; Park, Chanho ; You, Juneseok ; Kim, Taegyu ; Im, Chulhwan ; Kang, Junoh ; Shin, Haneul ; Choi, Chang Hwan ; Park, Jinsung ; Na, Sung Soo. / Ultra-sensitive in situ detection of silver ions using a quartz crystal microbalance. In: New Journal of Chemistry. 2015 ; Vol. 39, No. 10. pp. 8028-8034.
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