Using state administrative data to study nonfatal worker injuries

Challenges and opportunities

Meg Johantgen, Alison Trinkoff, Kathy Gray-Siracusa, Carles Muntaner, Karen Nielsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Problem: Administrative data from states have the potential to capture broader representation of worker injury, facilitating examination of trends, correlates, and patterns. While many states use their workers' compensation (WC) data to document frequency and type of injury, few conduct in-depth examinations of patterns of injury and other etiologies. Administrative data are generally an untapped resource. Method: Comparisons are made among four state databases used in a study linking worker injuries and patient outcomes in hospitals and nursing homes. Results: Worker injury data varies in terms of inclusion criteria, variables, and coding schemes used. Linkages to organizational level characteristics can be difficult. Conclusions: Despite limitations, data can be used to study injury patterns and etiologies. Users must be knowledgeable and recognize how database characteristics may influence results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-315
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Safety Research
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Aug 5
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

worker
Nursing
Wounds and Injuries
etiology
examination
Databases
Workers' Compensation
nursing home
coding
Nursing Homes
inclusion
trend
resources
Compensation and Redress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transportation
  • Safety Research
  • Law
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Chemical Health and Safety

Cite this

Using state administrative data to study nonfatal worker injuries : Challenges and opportunities. / Johantgen, Meg; Trinkoff, Alison; Gray-Siracusa, Kathy; Muntaner, Carles; Nielsen, Karen.

In: Journal of Safety Research, Vol. 35, No. 3, 05.08.2004, p. 309-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johantgen, M, Trinkoff, A, Gray-Siracusa, K, Muntaner, C & Nielsen, K 2004, 'Using state administrative data to study nonfatal worker injuries: Challenges and opportunities', Journal of Safety Research, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 309-315. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsr.2004.01.003
Johantgen, Meg ; Trinkoff, Alison ; Gray-Siracusa, Kathy ; Muntaner, Carles ; Nielsen, Karen. / Using state administrative data to study nonfatal worker injuries : Challenges and opportunities. In: Journal of Safety Research. 2004 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 309-315.
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