Using the developmental gene bicoid to identify species of forensically important blowflies (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

Seong Hwan Park, Chung Hyun Park, Yong Zhang, Huguo Piao, Ukhee Chung, Seong Yoon Kim, Kwang Soo Ko, Cheong Ho Yi, Tae Ho Jo, Juck Joon Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identifying species of insects used to estimate postmortem interval (PMI) is a major subject in forensic entomology. Because forensic insect specimens are morphologically uniform and are obtained at various developmental stages, DNA markers are greatly needed. To develop new autosomal DNA markers to identify species, partial genomic sequences of the bicoid (bcd) genes, containing the homeobox and its flanking sequences, from 12 blowfly species (Aldrichina grahami, Calliphora vicina, Calliphora lata, Triceratopyga calliphoroides, Chrysomya megacephala, Chrysomya pinguis, Phormia regina, Lucilia ampullacea, Lucilia caesar, Lucilia illustris, Hemipyrellia ligurriens and Lucilia sericata; Calliphoridae: Diptera) were determined and analyzed. This study first sequenced the ten blowfly species other than C. vicina and L. sericata. Based on the bcd sequences of these 12 blowfly species, a phylogenetic tree was constructed that discriminates the subfamilies of Calliphoridae (Luciliinae, Chrysomyinae, and Calliphorinae) and most blowfly species. Even partial genomic sequences of about 500 bp can distinguish most blowfly species. The short intron 2 and coding sequences downstream of the bcd homeobox in exon 3 could be utilized to develop DNA markers for forensic applications. These gene sequences are important in the evolution of insect developmental biology and are potentially useful for identifying insect species in forensic science.

Original languageEnglish
Article number538051
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Apr 29

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Developmental Genes
Diptera
Insects
Genes
Genetic Markers
Homeobox Genes
DNA
Entomology
Forensic Sciences
Developmental Biology
Introns
Exons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Using the developmental gene bicoid to identify species of forensically important blowflies (Diptera : Calliphoridae). / Park, Seong Hwan; Park, Chung Hyun; Zhang, Yong; Piao, Huguo; Chung, Ukhee; Kim, Seong Yoon; Ko, Kwang Soo; Yi, Cheong Ho; Jo, Tae Ho; Hwang, Juck Joon.

In: BioMed Research International, Vol. 2013, 538051, 29.04.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Park, Seong Hwan ; Park, Chung Hyun ; Zhang, Yong ; Piao, Huguo ; Chung, Ukhee ; Kim, Seong Yoon ; Ko, Kwang Soo ; Yi, Cheong Ho ; Jo, Tae Ho ; Hwang, Juck Joon. / Using the developmental gene bicoid to identify species of forensically important blowflies (Diptera : Calliphoridae). In: BioMed Research International. 2013 ; Vol. 2013.
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