Uterine biology in pigs and sheep

Fuller W. Bazer, Gwonhwa Song, Jinyoung Kim, Kathrin A. Dunlap, Michael C. Satterfield, Gregory A. Johnson, Robert C. Burghardt, Guoyao Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a dialogue between the developing conceptus (embryo-fetus and associated placental membranes) and maternal uterus which must be established during the peri-implantation period for pregnancy recognition signaling, implantation, regulation of gene expression by uterine epithelial and stromal cells, placentation and exchange of nutrients and gases. The uterus provide a microenvironment in which molecules secreted by uterine epithelia or transported into the uterine lumen represent histotroph required for growth and development of the conceptus and receptivity of the uterus to implantation. Pregnancy recognition signaling mechanisms sustain the functional lifespan of the corpora lutea (CL) which produce progesterone, the hormone of pregnancy essential for uterine functions that support implantation and placentation required for a successful outcome of pregnancy. It is within the peri-implantation period that most embryonic deaths occur due to deficiencies attributed to uterine functions or failure of the conceptus to develop appropriately, signal pregnancy recognition and/or undergo implantation and placentation. With proper placentation, the fetal fluids and fetal membranes each have unique functions to ensure hematotrophic and histotrophic nutrition in support of growth and development of the fetus. The endocrine status of the pregnant female and her nutritional status are critical for successful establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. This review addresses the complexity of key mechanisms that are characteristic of successful reproduction in sheep and pigs and gaps in knowledge that must be the subject of research in order to enhance fertility and reproductive health of livestock species.

Original languageEnglish
Article number23
JournalJournal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jul 16
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Placentation
Sheep
Swine
conceptus
pregnancy
Uterus
sheep
Biological Sciences
Pregnancy
swine
uterus
Growth and Development
Membranes
Fetus
Pregnancy Maintenance
fetus
Nutrition
growth and development
Extraembryonic Membranes
Gene expression

Keywords

  • Genes
  • Growth factors
  • Interferon stimulated
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy recognition
  • Uterus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Bazer, F. W., Song, G., Kim, J., Dunlap, K. A., Satterfield, M. C., Johnson, G. A., ... Wu, G. (2012). Uterine biology in pigs and sheep. Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, 3(1), [23]. https://doi.org/10.1186/2050-7445-3-23

Uterine biology in pigs and sheep. / Bazer, Fuller W.; Song, Gwonhwa; Kim, Jinyoung; Dunlap, Kathrin A.; Satterfield, Michael C.; Johnson, Gregory A.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Wu, Guoyao.

In: Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Vol. 3, No. 1, 23, 16.07.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bazer, FW, Song, G, Kim, J, Dunlap, KA, Satterfield, MC, Johnson, GA, Burghardt, RC & Wu, G 2012, 'Uterine biology in pigs and sheep', Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, vol. 3, no. 1, 23. https://doi.org/10.1186/2050-7445-3-23
Bazer FW, Song G, Kim J, Dunlap KA, Satterfield MC, Johnson GA et al. Uterine biology in pigs and sheep. Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology. 2012 Jul 16;3(1). 23. https://doi.org/10.1186/2050-7445-3-23
Bazer, Fuller W. ; Song, Gwonhwa ; Kim, Jinyoung ; Dunlap, Kathrin A. ; Satterfield, Michael C. ; Johnson, Gregory A. ; Burghardt, Robert C. ; Wu, Guoyao. / Uterine biology in pigs and sheep. In: Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology. 2012 ; Vol. 3, No. 1.
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