Validity and Reliability of the Early Development Instrument in Indonesia

Sally A. Brinkman, Angela Kinnell, Amelia Maika, Amer Hasan, Haeil Jung, Menno Pradhan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is increasing interest from international organizations and the research community to use internationally comparable instruments that in turn foster global understanding while providing evidence for local and international policy development. In the field of early childhood, international comparisons have traditionally been limited to indicators such as infant or child mortality and anthropometric data such as stunting and wasting. However, there has been gradual interest in developing international measures that can be used to compare and monitor the holistic development of children. Using both the short and standard versions of the Early Development Instrument (EDI), this paper reports on the process of adaptation of the EDI in Indonesia. Further, it explores the content and construct validity, internal consistency, inter-rater reliability and predictive validity of the EDI using a number of measures including the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, the Dimensional Change Card Sort, and school-based tests of language, mathematics and cognitive performance, collected from a number of informants (caregivers, teachers, and children). We report on data for two cohorts of children: the “younger cohort” were approximately 1 year old (N = 3116) and the “older cohort” were approximately 4 years old (N = 3251) at Time 1. Both cohorts were followed up approximately 4 years later, at Time 2. This study finds that the EDI shows moderate validity and reliability in poor communities in Indonesia and highlights some of the difficulties associated with adapting western instruments for non-western cultures and contexts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-352
Number of pages22
JournalChild Indicators Research
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jun 1

Fingerprint

Indonesia
Reproducibility of Results
Growth Disorders
Language Tests
Child Mortality
Mathematics
Policy Making
Infant Mortality
Child Development
Caregivers
Organizations
Research
international comparison
International Organizations
construct validity
development policy
community
caregiver
infant
mortality

Keywords

  • Child Development
  • Early Development Instrument (EDI)
  • Indonesia
  • Reliability
  • Validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Validity and Reliability of the Early Development Instrument in Indonesia. / Brinkman, Sally A.; Kinnell, Angela; Maika, Amelia; Hasan, Amer; Jung, Haeil; Pradhan, Menno.

In: Child Indicators Research, Vol. 10, No. 2, 01.06.2017, p. 331-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brinkman, SA, Kinnell, A, Maika, A, Hasan, A, Jung, H & Pradhan, M 2017, 'Validity and Reliability of the Early Development Instrument in Indonesia', Child Indicators Research, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 331-352. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12187-016-9372-4
Brinkman, Sally A. ; Kinnell, Angela ; Maika, Amelia ; Hasan, Amer ; Jung, Haeil ; Pradhan, Menno. / Validity and Reliability of the Early Development Instrument in Indonesia. In: Child Indicators Research. 2017 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 331-352.
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