Valorization of starchy, cellulosic, and sugary food waste into hydroxymethylfurfural by one-pot catalysis

Iris K.M. Yu, Daniel C.W. Tsang, Alex C.K. Yip, Season S. Chen, Yong Sik Ok, Chi Sun Poon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to produce a high-value platform chemical, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), from food waste and evaluate the catalytic performance of trivalent and tetravalent metals such as AlCl3, CrCl3, FeCl3, Zr(O)Cl2, and SnCl4 for one-pot conversion. Starchy food waste, e.g., cooked rice and penne produced 4.0–8.1 wt% HMF and 46.0–64.8 wt% glucose over SnCl4 after microwave heating at 140 °C for 20 min. This indicated that starch hydrolysis was effectively catalyzed but subsequent glucose isomerization was rate-limited during food waste valorization, which could be enhanced by 40-min reaction to achieve 22.7 wt% HMF from cooked rice. Sugary food waste, e.g., kiwifruit and watermelon, yielded up to 13 wt% HMF over Sn catalyst, which mainly resulted from naturally present fructose. Yet, organic acids in fruits may hinder Fe-catalyzed dehydration by competing for the Lewis sites. In contrast, conversion of raw mixed vegetables as cellulosic food waste was limited by marginal hydrolysis at the studied conditions (120–160 °C and 20–40 min). It is interesting to note that tetravalent metals enabled HMF production at a lower temperature and shorter time, while trivalent metals could achieve a higher HMF selectivity at an elevated temperature. Further studies on kinetics, thermodynamics, and reaction pathways of food waste valorization are recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1099-1107
Number of pages9
JournalChemosphere
Volume184
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

catalysis
Catalysis
food
Metals
hydrolysis
Hydrolysis
metal
glucose
rice
Glucose
Microwave heating
Organic acids
Vegetables
Isomerization
Fruits
Fructose
Dehydration
organic acid
dehydration
starch

Keywords

  • Biomass conversion
  • Biorefinery
  • Food waste
  • HMF
  • Metal catalysts
  • Waste valorization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Valorization of starchy, cellulosic, and sugary food waste into hydroxymethylfurfural by one-pot catalysis. / Yu, Iris K.M.; Tsang, Daniel C.W.; Yip, Alex C.K.; Chen, Season S.; Ok, Yong Sik; Poon, Chi Sun.

In: Chemosphere, Vol. 184, 01.01.2017, p. 1099-1107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yu, Iris K.M. ; Tsang, Daniel C.W. ; Yip, Alex C.K. ; Chen, Season S. ; Ok, Yong Sik ; Poon, Chi Sun. / Valorization of starchy, cellulosic, and sugary food waste into hydroxymethylfurfural by one-pot catalysis. In: Chemosphere. 2017 ; Vol. 184. pp. 1099-1107.
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