Vitamin D levels in children and adolescents with antiepileptic drug treatment

Jung Hyun Baek, Young Ho Seo, Gun Ha Kim, Mi Kyung Kim, Baik-Lin Eun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study was to evaluate the relationship of 25(OH)D3 levels with anticonvulsant use and other possible factors in epileptic children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: We studied 143 patients with epilepsy (90 boys, 53 girls; 11.21±4.49 years), who had been treated with anticonvulsants for more than 1 year. Patients who had taken multiple vitamins before the blood test and those who have the limitation of physical activity (wheelchair-bound) were excluded from the study. We evaluated the difference in vitamin D status according to the type and number of anticonvulsants taken and other factors such as gender, age, intelligence and seizure variables. Results: For patients with mental retardation or developmental delay, 25(OH)D3 levels were lower than the levels in patients with normal intelligence quotient levels (p=0.03). 25(OH)D3 levels were lower in patients who had taken anticonvulsants for more than 2 years as compared to those who had taken them for less than 2 years (p=0.03). Those taking oxcarbazepine had significantly lower vitamin D levels than patients taking valproic acid (p=0.01). However, no effects of number of anticonvulsants taken were detectable. More than two-thirds of the patients were diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis in patients showing either vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency. Conclusion: The possibility of vitamin D deficiency can be considered in pediatric patients taking anticonvulsants if they have mental retardation or developmental delay or if they have been taking anticonvulsants for more than 2 years or taking hepatic enzyme inducing drugs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)417-421
Number of pages5
JournalYonsei Medical Journal
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Vitamin D
Anticonvulsants
Therapeutics
Intelligence
Intellectual Disability
Avitaminosis
Wheelchairs
Vitamin D Deficiency
Metabolic Bone Diseases
Valproic Acid
Hematologic Tests
Vitamins
Osteoporosis
Epilepsy
Seizures
Exercise
Pediatrics
Liver
Enzymes
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Anticonvulsants
  • Developmental disabilities
  • Epilepsy
  • Intellectual disability
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Vitamin D levels in children and adolescents with antiepileptic drug treatment. / Baek, Jung Hyun; Seo, Young Ho; Kim, Gun Ha; Kim, Mi Kyung; Eun, Baik-Lin.

In: Yonsei Medical Journal, Vol. 55, No. 2, 01.03.2014, p. 417-421.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baek, Jung Hyun ; Seo, Young Ho ; Kim, Gun Ha ; Kim, Mi Kyung ; Eun, Baik-Lin. / Vitamin D levels in children and adolescents with antiepileptic drug treatment. In: Yonsei Medical Journal. 2014 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 417-421.
@article{7b641c7c0b74459d81d88d44cc016bae,
title = "Vitamin D levels in children and adolescents with antiepileptic drug treatment",
abstract = "Purpose: This study was to evaluate the relationship of 25(OH)D3 levels with anticonvulsant use and other possible factors in epileptic children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: We studied 143 patients with epilepsy (90 boys, 53 girls; 11.21±4.49 years), who had been treated with anticonvulsants for more than 1 year. Patients who had taken multiple vitamins before the blood test and those who have the limitation of physical activity (wheelchair-bound) were excluded from the study. We evaluated the difference in vitamin D status according to the type and number of anticonvulsants taken and other factors such as gender, age, intelligence and seizure variables. Results: For patients with mental retardation or developmental delay, 25(OH)D3 levels were lower than the levels in patients with normal intelligence quotient levels (p=0.03). 25(OH)D3 levels were lower in patients who had taken anticonvulsants for more than 2 years as compared to those who had taken them for less than 2 years (p=0.03). Those taking oxcarbazepine had significantly lower vitamin D levels than patients taking valproic acid (p=0.01). However, no effects of number of anticonvulsants taken were detectable. More than two-thirds of the patients were diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis in patients showing either vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency. Conclusion: The possibility of vitamin D deficiency can be considered in pediatric patients taking anticonvulsants if they have mental retardation or developmental delay or if they have been taking anticonvulsants for more than 2 years or taking hepatic enzyme inducing drugs.",
keywords = "Anticonvulsants, Developmental disabilities, Epilepsy, Intellectual disability, Vitamin D",
author = "Baek, {Jung Hyun} and Seo, {Young Ho} and Kim, {Gun Ha} and Kim, {Mi Kyung} and Baik-Lin Eun",
year = "2014",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3349/ymj.2014.55.2.417",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "417--421",
journal = "Yonsei Medical Journal",
issn = "0513-5796",
publisher = "Yonsei University College of Medicine",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vitamin D levels in children and adolescents with antiepileptic drug treatment

AU - Baek, Jung Hyun

AU - Seo, Young Ho

AU - Kim, Gun Ha

AU - Kim, Mi Kyung

AU - Eun, Baik-Lin

PY - 2014/3/1

Y1 - 2014/3/1

N2 - Purpose: This study was to evaluate the relationship of 25(OH)D3 levels with anticonvulsant use and other possible factors in epileptic children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: We studied 143 patients with epilepsy (90 boys, 53 girls; 11.21±4.49 years), who had been treated with anticonvulsants for more than 1 year. Patients who had taken multiple vitamins before the blood test and those who have the limitation of physical activity (wheelchair-bound) were excluded from the study. We evaluated the difference in vitamin D status according to the type and number of anticonvulsants taken and other factors such as gender, age, intelligence and seizure variables. Results: For patients with mental retardation or developmental delay, 25(OH)D3 levels were lower than the levels in patients with normal intelligence quotient levels (p=0.03). 25(OH)D3 levels were lower in patients who had taken anticonvulsants for more than 2 years as compared to those who had taken them for less than 2 years (p=0.03). Those taking oxcarbazepine had significantly lower vitamin D levels than patients taking valproic acid (p=0.01). However, no effects of number of anticonvulsants taken were detectable. More than two-thirds of the patients were diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis in patients showing either vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency. Conclusion: The possibility of vitamin D deficiency can be considered in pediatric patients taking anticonvulsants if they have mental retardation or developmental delay or if they have been taking anticonvulsants for more than 2 years or taking hepatic enzyme inducing drugs.

AB - Purpose: This study was to evaluate the relationship of 25(OH)D3 levels with anticonvulsant use and other possible factors in epileptic children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: We studied 143 patients with epilepsy (90 boys, 53 girls; 11.21±4.49 years), who had been treated with anticonvulsants for more than 1 year. Patients who had taken multiple vitamins before the blood test and those who have the limitation of physical activity (wheelchair-bound) were excluded from the study. We evaluated the difference in vitamin D status according to the type and number of anticonvulsants taken and other factors such as gender, age, intelligence and seizure variables. Results: For patients with mental retardation or developmental delay, 25(OH)D3 levels were lower than the levels in patients with normal intelligence quotient levels (p=0.03). 25(OH)D3 levels were lower in patients who had taken anticonvulsants for more than 2 years as compared to those who had taken them for less than 2 years (p=0.03). Those taking oxcarbazepine had significantly lower vitamin D levels than patients taking valproic acid (p=0.01). However, no effects of number of anticonvulsants taken were detectable. More than two-thirds of the patients were diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis in patients showing either vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency. Conclusion: The possibility of vitamin D deficiency can be considered in pediatric patients taking anticonvulsants if they have mental retardation or developmental delay or if they have been taking anticonvulsants for more than 2 years or taking hepatic enzyme inducing drugs.

KW - Anticonvulsants

KW - Developmental disabilities

KW - Epilepsy

KW - Intellectual disability

KW - Vitamin D

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84894274305&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84894274305&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3349/ymj.2014.55.2.417

DO - 10.3349/ymj.2014.55.2.417

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 417

EP - 421

JO - Yonsei Medical Journal

JF - Yonsei Medical Journal

SN - 0513-5796

IS - 2

ER -