Vulnerabilities to temperature effects on acute myocardial infarction hospital admissions in South Korea

Bo Yeon Kwon, Eun Il Lee, Suji Lee, Seulkee Heo, Kyunghee Jo, Jinsun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most previous studies have focused on the association between acute myocardial function (AMI) and temperature by gender and age. Recently, however, concern has also arisen about those most susceptible to the effects of temperature according to socioeconomic status (SES). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI by subpopulations (gender, age, living area, and individual SES) in South Korea. The Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) database was used to examine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI during 2004–2012. We analyzed the increase in AMI hospital admissions both above and below a threshold temperature using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs) for hot, cold, and warm weather. The Medicaid group, the lowest SES group, had a significantly higher RR of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.07–1.76) for heat and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04–1.20) for cold among subgroups, while also showing distinctly higher risk curves than NHI for both hot and cold weather. In additions, females, older age group, and those living in urban areas had higher risks from hot and cold temperatures than males, younger age group, and those living in rural areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14571-14588
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume12
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Nov 13

Fingerprint

Republic of Korea
Myocardial Infarction
Temperature
Hot Temperature
Social Class
Weather
Age Groups
Medicaid
National Health Programs
Korea
Databases

Keywords

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Hospital admissions
  • Medicaid
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Vulnerabilities to temperature effects on acute myocardial infarction hospital admissions in South Korea. / Kwon, Bo Yeon; Lee, Eun Il; Lee, Suji; Heo, Seulkee; Jo, Kyunghee; Kim, Jinsun.

In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 12, No. 11, 13.11.2015, p. 14571-14588.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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