Wafer-Scale Microwire Transistor Array Fabricated via Evaporative Assembly

Jae Hoon Park, Qijun Sun, Yongsuk Choi, Seungwoo Lee, Dong Yun Lee, Yong Hoon Kim, Jeong Ho Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One-dimensional (1D) nano/microwires have attracted significant attention as promising building blocks for various electronic and optical device applications. The integration of these elements into functional device networks with controlled alignment and density presents a significant challenge for practical device applications. Here, we demonstrated the fabrication of wafer-scale microwire field-effect transistor (FET) arrays based on well-aligned inorganic semiconductor microwires (indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO)) and organic polymeric insulator microwires fabricated via a simple and large-area evaporative assembly technique. This microwire fabrication method offers a facile approach to precisely manipulating the channel dimensions of the FETs. The resulting solution-processed monolithic IGZO microwire FETs exhibited a maximum electron mobility of 1.02 cm 2 V -1 s -1 and an on/off current ratio of 1 × 10 6 . The appropriate choice of the polymeric microwires used to define the channel lengths enabled fine control over the threshold voltages of the devices, which were employed to fabricate high-performance depletion-load inverters. Low-voltage-operated microwire FETs were successfully fabricated on a plastic substrate using a high-capacitance ion gel gate dielectric. The microwire fabrication technique involving evaporative assembly provided a facile, effective, and reliable method for preparing flexible large-area electronics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15543-15550
Number of pages8
JournalACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume8
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jun 22
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Field effect transistors
Transistors
Zinc Oxide
Gallium
Indium
Zinc oxide
Fabrication
Electron mobility
Gate dielectrics
Optical devices
Threshold voltage
Capacitance
Electronic equipment
Gels
Ions
Semiconductor materials
Plastics
Electric potential
Substrates

Keywords

  • blade-coating
  • metal oxide semiconductor
  • microwire transistor
  • plasma-induced metallization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Wafer-Scale Microwire Transistor Array Fabricated via Evaporative Assembly. / Park, Jae Hoon; Sun, Qijun; Choi, Yongsuk; Lee, Seungwoo; Lee, Dong Yun; Kim, Yong Hoon; Cho, Jeong Ho.

In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, Vol. 8, No. 24, 22.06.2016, p. 15543-15550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Park, Jae Hoon ; Sun, Qijun ; Choi, Yongsuk ; Lee, Seungwoo ; Lee, Dong Yun ; Kim, Yong Hoon ; Cho, Jeong Ho. / Wafer-Scale Microwire Transistor Array Fabricated via Evaporative Assembly. In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. 2016 ; Vol. 8, No. 24. pp. 15543-15550.
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