Widefield illumination photoacoustic imaging of blood vessel phantom

Jae Ho Han, Jaepyeong Cha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We achieved photoacoustic tomographic imaging by employing widefield illumination using a pulsed laser source that irradiates the entire area of interest for the specimen under investigation. This approach can be simpler and more efficient than the use of narrow point-source scanning. Tomographic images were computed via an inverse-reconstruction-based algorithm from signals acquired using a single transducer with circular scanning configuration. The signals were coupled to the transducer probe with index-matching gel around the circumference of the specimen, eliminating the need for aquatic immersion. A blood-vessel-mimicking phantom was used to demonstrate our setup and the image reconstruction was also verified by simulation, proving the feasibility of a miniaturized system based on this design.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMicrowave and Optical Technology Letters
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Photoacoustic effect
blood vessels
Blood vessels
Transducers
transducers
Lighting
illumination
Scanning
Imaging techniques
scanning
circumferences
image reconstruction
Image reconstruction
Pulsed lasers
submerging
point sources
Light sources
pulsed lasers
Gels
gels

Keywords

  • photoacoustic imaging
  • pulsed laser
  • tomography
  • transducer
  • widefield illumination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Widefield illumination photoacoustic imaging of blood vessel phantom. / Han, Jae Ho; Cha, Jaepyeong.

In: Microwave and Optical Technology Letters, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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