Willingness to pay for reduced risk of foodborne illness: A nonhypothetical field experiment

Rodolfo M. Nayga, Jr, Richard Woodward, Wipon Aiew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper focuses on estimating willingness to pay for reducing risk of getting foodborne illness using a nonhypothetical field experiment utilizing real food products (i.e., ground beef), real cash, and actual exchange in a market setting. Respondents were given information about the nature of food irradiation. Single-bounded and one and one-half bounded models are developed using dichotomous choice experiments. Our results indicate that individuals are willing to pay for a reduction in the risk of foodborne illness once informed about the nature of food irradiation. Our respondents are willing to pay a premium of about $0.77 for a pound of irradiated ground beef, which is higher than the cost to irradiate the product.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)461-475
Number of pages15
JournalCanadian Journal of Agricultural Economics
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Food Irradiation
food irradiation
Foodborne Diseases
ground beef
willingness to pay
foodborne illness
risk reduction
Risk Reduction Behavior
foods
markets
Costs and Cost Analysis
Food
market
cost
experiment
Red Meat
Surveys and Questionnaires
field experiment
Willingness-to-pay
Beef

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Willingness to pay for reduced risk of foodborne illness : A nonhypothetical field experiment. / Nayga, Jr, Rodolfo M.; Woodward, Richard; Aiew, Wipon.

In: Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 54, No. 4, 01.12.2006, p. 461-475.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nayga, Jr, Rodolfo M. ; Woodward, Richard ; Aiew, Wipon. / Willingness to pay for reduced risk of foodborne illness : A nonhypothetical field experiment. In: Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics. 2006 ; Vol. 54, No. 4. pp. 461-475.
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