Work or place? Assessing the concurrent effects of workplace exploitation and area-of-residence economic inequality on individual health

Carles Muntaner, Yong Li, Edwin Ng, Joan Benach, Haejoo Chung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Building on previous multilevel studies in social epidemiology, this cross-sectional study examines, simultaneously, the contextual effects of workplace exploitation and area-of-residence economic inequality on social inequalities in health among low-income nursing assistants. A total of 868 nursing assistants recruited from 55 nursing homes in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia were surveyed between 1999 and 2001. Using a cross-classified multilevel design, the authors tested the effects of area-of-residence (income inequality and racial segregation), workplace (type of nursing home ownership and managerial pressure), and individual-level (age, gender, race/ethnicity, health insurance, length of employment, social support, type of nursing unit, preexisting psychopathology, physical health, education, and income) variables on health (self-reported health and activity limitations) and behavioral outcomes (alcohol use and caffeine consumption). Findings reveal that overall health was associated with both workplace exploitation and area-of-residence income inequality; area of residence was associated with activity limitations and binge drinking; and workplace exploitation was associated with caffeine consumption. This study explicitly accounts for the multiple contextual structure and effects of economic inequality on health. More work is necessary to replicate the current findings and establish robust conclusions on workplace and area of residence that might help inform interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-50
Number of pages24
JournalInternational Journal of Health Services
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jan 1

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Workplace
Economics
Health
Nursing
Nursing Homes
Caffeine
Binge Drinking
Physical Education and Training
Ownership
Health Insurance
Psychopathology
Health Education
Social Support
Epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Alcohols
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Work or place? Assessing the concurrent effects of workplace exploitation and area-of-residence economic inequality on individual health. / Muntaner, Carles; Li, Yong; Ng, Edwin; Benach, Joan; Chung, Haejoo.

In: International Journal of Health Services, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 27-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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