Worksite safety climate, smoking, and the use of protective equipment by blue-collar building workers enrolled in the Mass BUILT smoking cessation trial

Lauren M. Dutra, Seung-Sup Kim, David R. Williams, Ichiro Kawachi, Cassandra A. Okechukwu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess potential contributors to high injury rates and smoking prevalence among construction workers, we investigated the association of safety climate with personal protective equipment use, and smoking behaviors.

Methods: Logistic regression models estimated risk ratios for personal protective equipment use and smoking using data from participants in Mass BUILT smoking cessation intervention (n = 1725).

Results: Contractor safety climate was negatively associated with the use of dust masks (rate ratio [RR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83 to 0.94), respirators (RR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.89), general equipment (RR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.00), and fall protection (RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91 to 0.98) and positively associated with current smoking (RR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.25) but not smoking cessation. Coworker safety climate was negatively associated with the use of dust masks (RR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.92), respirators (RR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.74 to 0.87), general equipment (RR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94 to 0.98), fall (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.89 to 0.96), and hearing protection (RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.93) but not smoking.

Conclusions: Worksite safety climate may be important for personal protective equipment use and smoking, but further research is needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1082-1087
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume56
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Oct 8

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Smoking Cessation
Climate
Workplace
Smoking
Confidence Intervals
Safety
Equipment and Supplies
Mechanical Ventilators
Masks
Dust
Logistic Models
Hearing
Odds Ratio
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Worksite safety climate, smoking, and the use of protective equipment by blue-collar building workers enrolled in the Mass BUILT smoking cessation trial. / Dutra, Lauren M.; Kim, Seung-Sup; Williams, David R.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Okechukwu, Cassandra A.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 56, No. 10, 08.10.2014, p. 1082-1087.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To assess potential contributors to high injury rates and smoking prevalence among construction workers, we investigated the association of safety climate with personal protective equipment use, and smoking behaviors.Methods: Logistic regression models estimated risk ratios for personal protective equipment use and smoking using data from participants in Mass BUILT smoking cessation intervention (n = 1725).Results: Contractor safety climate was negatively associated with the use of dust masks (rate ratio [RR], 0.88; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.83 to 0.94), respirators (RR, 0.82; 95{\%} CI, 0.75 to 0.89), general equipment (RR, 0.98; 95{\%} CI, 0.95 to 1.00), and fall protection (RR, 0.94; 95{\%} CI, 0.91 to 0.98) and positively associated with current smoking (RR, 1.12; 95{\%} CI, 1.01 to 1.25) but not smoking cessation. Coworker safety climate was negatively associated with the use of dust masks (RR, 0.87; 95{\%} CI, 0.82 to 0.92), respirators (RR, 0.80; 95{\%} CI, 0.74 to 0.87), general equipment (RR, 0.96; 95{\%} CI, 0.94 to 0.98), fall (RR, 0.92; 95{\%} CI, 0.89 to 0.96), and hearing protection (RR, 0.88; 95{\%} CI, 0.83 to 0.93) but not smoking.Conclusions: Worksite safety climate may be important for personal protective equipment use and smoking, but further research is needed.",
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