World Health Organization Ranking of Antimicrobials According to Their Importance in Human Medicine: A Critical Step for Developing Risk Management Strategies to Control Antimicrobial Resistance from Food Animal Production

Peter C. Collignon, John M. Conly, Antoine Andremont, Scott A. McEwen, Awa Aidara-Kane, Patricia M. Griffin, Yvonne Agerso, Tran Dang Ninh, Pilar Donado-Godoy, Paula Fedorka-Cray, Heriberto Fernandez, Marcelo Galas, Rebecca Irwin, Beth Karp, Gassan Matar, Patrick McDermott, Eric Mitema, Richard Reid-Smith, H. Morgan Scott, Ruby SinghCaroline Smith Dewaal, John Stelling, Mark Toleman, Haruo Watanabe, Gun Jo Woo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

118 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antimicrobial use in food animals selects for antimicrobial resistance in bacteria, which can spread to people. Reducing use of antimicrobials - particularly those deemed to be critically important for human medicine - in food production animals continues to be an important step for preserving the benefits of these antimicrobials for people. The World Health Organization ranking of antimicrobials according to their relative importance in human medicine was recently updated. Antimicrobials considered the highest priority among the critically important antimicrobials were quinolones, third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, macrolides and ketolides, and glycopeptides. The updated ranking allows stakeholders in the agriculture sector and regulatory agencies to focus risk management efforts on drugs used in food animals that are the most important to human medicine. In particular, the current large-scale use of fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and third-generation cephalosporins and any potential use of glycopeptides and carbapenems need to be addressed urgently.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1087-1093
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume63
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Oct 15

Keywords

  • Animals
  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Antimicrobials
  • Food production
  • Risk management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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