Year-round irrigation schedule for a tomato-maize rotation system in reservoir-based irrigation schemes in Ghana

Ephraim Sekyi-Annan, Bernhard Tischbein, Bernd Diekkrüger, Asia Khamzina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Improving irrigation management in semi-arid regions of Sub-Saharan Africa is crucial to respond to increasing variability in rainfall and overcome deficits in current irrigation schemes. In small-scale and medium-scale reservoir-based irrigation schemes in the Upper East region of Ghana, we explored options for improving the traditional, dry season irrigation practices and assessed the potential for supplemental irrigation in the rainy season. The AquaCrop model was used to (i) assess current water management in the typical tomato-maize rotational system; (ii) develop an improved irrigation schedule for dry season cultivation of tomato; and (iii) determine the requirement for supplemental irrigation of maize in the rainy season under different climate scenarios. The improved irrigation schedule for dry season tomato cultivation would result in a water saving of 130-1325 mm compared to traditional irrigation practices, accompanied by approximately a 4-14% increase in tomato yield. The supplemental irrigation of maize would require 107-126 mm of water in periods of low rainfall and frequent dry spells, and 88-105 mm in periods of high rainfall and rare dry spells. Therefore, year-round irrigated crop production may be feasible, using water saved during dry season tomato cultivation for supplemental irrigation of maize in the rainy season.

Original languageEnglish
Article number624
JournalWater (Switzerland)
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 May 10

Fingerprint

Ghana
Lycopersicon esculentum
irrigation
Irrigation
irrigation management
Zea mays
Appointments and Schedules
maize
tomatoes
corn
dry season
Water
wet season
rain
Rain
irrigated farming
water
rainfall
Africa South of the Sahara
Climate

Keywords

  • AquaCrop model
  • Capillary rise
  • Climate change
  • Rainfall variability
  • Supplemental irrigation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Aquatic Science
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Year-round irrigation schedule for a tomato-maize rotation system in reservoir-based irrigation schemes in Ghana. / Sekyi-Annan, Ephraim; Tischbein, Bernhard; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Khamzina, Asia.

In: Water (Switzerland), Vol. 10, No. 5, 624, 10.05.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7bf9cfdddb12443cbe2a4aff34efe23c,
title = "Year-round irrigation schedule for a tomato-maize rotation system in reservoir-based irrigation schemes in Ghana",
abstract = "Improving irrigation management in semi-arid regions of Sub-Saharan Africa is crucial to respond to increasing variability in rainfall and overcome deficits in current irrigation schemes. In small-scale and medium-scale reservoir-based irrigation schemes in the Upper East region of Ghana, we explored options for improving the traditional, dry season irrigation practices and assessed the potential for supplemental irrigation in the rainy season. The AquaCrop model was used to (i) assess current water management in the typical tomato-maize rotational system; (ii) develop an improved irrigation schedule for dry season cultivation of tomato; and (iii) determine the requirement for supplemental irrigation of maize in the rainy season under different climate scenarios. The improved irrigation schedule for dry season tomato cultivation would result in a water saving of 130-1325 mm compared to traditional irrigation practices, accompanied by approximately a 4-14{\%} increase in tomato yield. The supplemental irrigation of maize would require 107-126 mm of water in periods of low rainfall and frequent dry spells, and 88-105 mm in periods of high rainfall and rare dry spells. Therefore, year-round irrigated crop production may be feasible, using water saved during dry season tomato cultivation for supplemental irrigation of maize in the rainy season.",
keywords = "AquaCrop model, Capillary rise, Climate change, Rainfall variability, Supplemental irrigation",
author = "Ephraim Sekyi-Annan and Bernhard Tischbein and Bernd Diekkr{\"u}ger and Asia Khamzina",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "10",
doi = "10.3390/w10050624",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Water (Switzerland)",
issn = "2073-4441",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Year-round irrigation schedule for a tomato-maize rotation system in reservoir-based irrigation schemes in Ghana

AU - Sekyi-Annan, Ephraim

AU - Tischbein, Bernhard

AU - Diekkrüger, Bernd

AU - Khamzina, Asia

PY - 2018/5/10

Y1 - 2018/5/10

N2 - Improving irrigation management in semi-arid regions of Sub-Saharan Africa is crucial to respond to increasing variability in rainfall and overcome deficits in current irrigation schemes. In small-scale and medium-scale reservoir-based irrigation schemes in the Upper East region of Ghana, we explored options for improving the traditional, dry season irrigation practices and assessed the potential for supplemental irrigation in the rainy season. The AquaCrop model was used to (i) assess current water management in the typical tomato-maize rotational system; (ii) develop an improved irrigation schedule for dry season cultivation of tomato; and (iii) determine the requirement for supplemental irrigation of maize in the rainy season under different climate scenarios. The improved irrigation schedule for dry season tomato cultivation would result in a water saving of 130-1325 mm compared to traditional irrigation practices, accompanied by approximately a 4-14% increase in tomato yield. The supplemental irrigation of maize would require 107-126 mm of water in periods of low rainfall and frequent dry spells, and 88-105 mm in periods of high rainfall and rare dry spells. Therefore, year-round irrigated crop production may be feasible, using water saved during dry season tomato cultivation for supplemental irrigation of maize in the rainy season.

AB - Improving irrigation management in semi-arid regions of Sub-Saharan Africa is crucial to respond to increasing variability in rainfall and overcome deficits in current irrigation schemes. In small-scale and medium-scale reservoir-based irrigation schemes in the Upper East region of Ghana, we explored options for improving the traditional, dry season irrigation practices and assessed the potential for supplemental irrigation in the rainy season. The AquaCrop model was used to (i) assess current water management in the typical tomato-maize rotational system; (ii) develop an improved irrigation schedule for dry season cultivation of tomato; and (iii) determine the requirement for supplemental irrigation of maize in the rainy season under different climate scenarios. The improved irrigation schedule for dry season tomato cultivation would result in a water saving of 130-1325 mm compared to traditional irrigation practices, accompanied by approximately a 4-14% increase in tomato yield. The supplemental irrigation of maize would require 107-126 mm of water in periods of low rainfall and frequent dry spells, and 88-105 mm in periods of high rainfall and rare dry spells. Therefore, year-round irrigated crop production may be feasible, using water saved during dry season tomato cultivation for supplemental irrigation of maize in the rainy season.

KW - AquaCrop model

KW - Capillary rise

KW - Climate change

KW - Rainfall variability

KW - Supplemental irrigation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85046865717&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85046865717&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/w10050624

DO - 10.3390/w10050624

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - Water (Switzerland)

JF - Water (Switzerland)

SN - 2073-4441

IS - 5

M1 - 624

ER -